Cool Down.

Fall in Maine does not approach calmly or with advance notice. On one day, it’s summer. The leaves are green, the air is warm, the flowers in bloom and the tourists cover the roads like lost frogs oblivious to the traffic bering down on them. Local drivers like to award point values.

This morning fall arrived. It is not an arguable point. The temperature out side, as well as in, is chilly, and the sad fact that the heat will need switching on after a long summer break is inescapable. If any doubt remained to the change of seasons, then the arrival of the cats last night, sleeping on our bed, removed any further argument. It’s time to button up and get ready for the cold.

The trick with Fall in the upper New England states (Here, I’m talking about Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont) is that there is no good way to dress for a day like today. When I got up, it was feeling quite raw. Socks and a flannel shirt was picked out for my own attire while miniature sweaters with a variety of entertaining themes were put on the kids. That, and the comfort of corduroy pants for Short Stack. It was that cold.

To quote my son, today was quickly turing into, “A fine, bright day”. Every day is a “fine, bright day” for him now. It’s a quote from one of his favorite Miffy episodes and he tells it to us often. Pretty much, if it’s not actually raining, he decrees it a “fine, bright day.”

Today however, he was correct. Bright, fine and nippy. After my first two cups of coffee were gone and the grisly remains of a shared english muffin sat next to me on my plate, we headed out on to our porch. The mid morning sun flooded over the various toys and strollers and Short Stack amused him self with some plastic trucks while Lulu Belle reclined in her bouncy seat and soaked up some vitamin D. I worked on cup number three. Within about ten minutes, I was shedding my flannel and stripping objecting children of their woolens. By the time it I had to get them to the baby sitter’s I was in shorts and sandals. Mother Nature in New England might not throw earthquakes, fire storms, or tornados at us too often, but she does try to confuse us to death.

The part that amazes me the most is our neighbor. She left for the season just yesterday and her timing this year is verging on the clairvoyant. She is a summer resident of our little corner of costal Maine and calls Florida her home most of the year. She’s single, in her seventies and appears in portrait in most dictionaries next to the definition of “Fire Cracker”. We love to see her arrive each summer and bring her boundless personality with her along with the official mark of “High Summer”. She adds a lot of life the place and lets nothing stop her, with one exception; the cold.

“Cold” is a relative term, really. I like to think I’m pretty tough when it comes to winter. Born and raised in New Hampshire, I’ve seen snow and freezing temperatures and they don’t scare me. I am however, a big wimp compared to a good friend of mine who is a native of North Dakota. If I’ve got maple syrup in my veins, then she’s got molasses. I may not gripe about the snow, but she goes out in it barefoot to get the mail from the end of the drive. Routinely. That, is tough.

If I’ve got maple syrup for blood and my friend has molasses, then our hot shot, summer neighbor has tap water. Action Girl and I have seen her in a full length down coat in June and come the first whisper of the possibility of a rumor of cold weather moving for the season, she locks up the house and returns to the stifling heat of central Florida. She probably doesn’t even switch on the AC when she gets there.

The amazing part for me is that she has been gone now for exactly 24 hours and fall has moved in like it’s been waiting for he flight to leave. From now on, the windows will be mostly closed around our house and I’ll start panicking about the outside jobs that I’ve been foolishly putting off all summer. I’ll test the generator out this weekend, just to make sure the gas is still good lest we discover it otherwise come a power outage in mid winter. I’m not going through THAT again!

There are some real good things to look forward to as well though and Fall is truly my favorite season. The leaves blaze up with the colors of a thousand sunsets. The tourist, bedecked in their fanny packs and out sized cameras start to thin out and the black fly and mosquito finally meet a deterrent mightier than Deep Woods Off. Frost! I’ll get to go to the range more often and do some shooting and with some luck, go turkey hunting with a friend once the leaves drop. It’s all worth the chill, so far as I’m concerned. In just a few weeks, I’ll be able to put on one set of clothes and leave them on for the whole day without broiling come noon or freezing once the sun goes down. Okay, the freezing part will probably happen, regardless. It’s a long, cold winter here, but I’m not complaining. It aint North Dakota!

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3 Responses

  1. Oh, my goodness, the blue/orange-red contrast in that pic is incredible! Those are not this year’s leaves yet, right?

    I have to admit to having tap water running through my veins. I can’t stand the cold. I enjoy the fall once the frost has knocked out the bugs and the pun’kin and apple picking and the vibrant colors of the leaves, but that’s it. I pulled out the fleece yesterday and today only partly because of the chill outside…I need the warmth just sitting at my desk at work! I wouldn’t survive Maine in the winter, never mind North Dakota!

    Nooo. That’s not this year’s, though it is Maine. I believe it was taken up in Rangeley which is beautiful country but a pain to get to. Amazing how those two things seem to go hand in hand. To give proper credit for the photo, it came from here. There are some other real stunning fall photos from this person to check out.
    -TP

  2. Turkish, you’re from Maine? I mean right now? My dad was born and raised in Sanford, ME. He’s French Canadian, grew up speaking French in the home and went into the Navy. Met my lovely mom and they moved to MI and that was that. I’ve only been to ME prolly twice in my whole life. If the foilage is that sweet, I should come there more often. Having not lived in MI or up north for Years though, I’m afraid I’m acclimated to the warmth, such as your elderly friend.

    Sanford is just down the coast from me. There’s a great airport there that I’ve flown in and out of a few times in the past. The fall foliage is most defiantly worth seeing if you’ve never experienced it. The real cold won’t hit for a little while yet, so you’re probably safe.
    -TP

  3. It’s still warm where I am, but October usually brings a cooler temperature. Fall is fine, although it does bring thoughts of unpleasant “mid-winter showers” to mind. I can endure the cold, but I’m more tap water than maple syrup or molasses.

    Wait… Aren’t you Canadian? How did you survive? Oh… or was moving to Japan a survival tactic?
    -TP

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